Wednesday, July 05, 2006

Silver Surfers - as keen as the industry wants us to believe?

Mixed messages on the Silver Surfers issue following the UK’s media regulator Ofcom’s report on the impact of the internet on so-called marginalised groups.

According to the BBC “just 28% of people over the age of 65 have home internet access, compared to a UK average of 57% of households”, making it difficult for pensioners to access government information and “competitive deals” on consumer goods.

These statistics are from Ofcom’s Consumer Panel, but the results run counter to other studies which put the so-called Silver Surfers as the fastest growing age groups on the web with a massive enthusiasm for buying products – especially travel – online.

[Read Travolution’s Silver Surfers feature from the June edition]

Kevin May, editor, Travolution

3 comments:

gail kenny said...

We know demographics show that the UK has an ageing population. With more 55-64 year olds than 16-24 year olds in the UK, travel companies are very quick to target this fastest growing age groups on the web, as they have a massive enthusiasm for buying products – especially travel – online. However, what a shame that these companies do not consider this age bracket when recruiting talent into their own organisations. A vast majority of companies discriminate against the older workforce. Under the proposed new law, there will be a ban on unjustified age discrimination in recruitment, promotion and training opportunities. There will also be a default retirement age of 65. Employers must realise that the older generation can offer maturity, flexibility and a wealth of knowledge. They still have energy and vision - they can be strong mentors too. If companies continue to insist on taking employees under 40, in 10 years time there will be an even smaller pool of talent to choose from. Surely they must realise this.

Gail Kenny said...

We know demographics show that the UK has an ageing population. With more 55-64 year olds than 16-24 year olds in the UK, travel companies are very quick to target this fastest growing age groups on the web, as they have a massive enthusiasm for buying products – especially travel – online. However, what a shame that these companies do not consider this age bracket when recruiting talent into their own organisations. A vast majority of companies discriminate against the older workforce. Under the proposed new law, there will be a ban on unjustified age discrimination in recruitment, promotion and training opportunities. There will also be a default retirement age of 65. Employers must realise that the older generation can offer maturity, flexibility and a wealth of knowledge. They still have energy and vision - they can be strong mentors too. If companies continue to insist on taking employees under 40, in 10 years time there will be an even smaller pool of talent to choose from. Surely they must realise this.

Gail Kenny said...

We know demographics show that the UK has an ageing population. With more 55-64 year olds than 16-24 year olds in the UK, travel companies are very quick to target this fastest growing age groups on the web, as they have a massive enthusiasm for buying products – especially travel – online. However, what a shame that these companies do not consider this age bracket when recruiting talent into their own organisations. A vast majority of companies discriminate against the older workforce. Under the proposed new law, there will be a ban on unjustified age discrimination in recruitment, promotion and training opportunities. There will also be a default retirement age of 65. Employers must realise that the older generation can offer maturity, flexibility and a wealth of knowledge. They still have energy and vision - they can be strong mentors too. If companies continue to insist on taking employees under 40, in 10 years time there will be an even smaller pool of talent to choose from. Surely they must realise this.